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Home » Slow Heart Rate

“Understanding Slow Heart Rate: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment Options”

Overview

Overview

Symptoms

Symptoms

Causes

Causes

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Treatment

Treatment

Self-care

Self Care

Overview

Slow heart rate, also known as bradycardia, refers to a condition in which the heart beats at a slower rate than normal. It is typically defined as a resting heart rate below 60 beats per minute (bpm) in adults. Medical professionals may use different terms to describe slow heart rate, depending on the underlying cause and specific characteristics of the condition. Some of these terms include sinus bradycardia, which refers to a slow heart rate originating from the sinus node, and heart block, which occurs when there is an obstruction or delay in the electrical signals that regulate the heartbeat. The prevalence of slow heart rate in the United States varies depending on the population being studied and the specific definition used. Slow heart rate can be categorized into different phases based on the severity and symptoms experienced:
  • Asymptomatic Bradycardia: In this phase, individuals may not experience any noticeable symptoms despite having a slow heart rate. This is common in athletes or people with good cardiovascular fitness.
  • Mild Symptoms: Some individuals with slow heart rates may experience mild symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, lightheadedness, or shortness of breath during physical activity or exertion.
  • Severe Symptoms: In more severe cases, a slow heart rate can lead to symptoms like fainting (syncope), chest pain, confusion, or difficulty concentrating. These symptoms occur due to inadequate blood flow and oxygen supply to the body.
  • Bradycardia-Tachycardia Syndrome: This condition refers to alternating episodes of bradycardia and tachycardia (rapid heart rate). It can cause palpitations, irregular heartbeat, and a range of other symptoms.
slow heart rate

Symptoms

In some cases, individuals may not experience any noticeable symptoms, especially if they are physically fit or have adapted to a lower resting heart rate. However, when symptoms do occur, they can include:

  • Fatigue: Feeling excessively tired or lacking energy, even with minimal physical exertion.
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness: Feeling faint, dizzy, or lightheaded, especially when standing up or changing positions quickly.
  • Shortness of breath: Difficulty breathing or a sensation of breathlessness, particularly during physical activity or exertion.
  • Chest discomfort: Mild chest pain, discomfort, or pressure.
  • Fainting or near-fainting (syncope): Brief loss of consciousness or feeling lightheaded to the point of nearly passing out.
  • Confusion or difficulty concentrating: Impaired cognitive function, difficulty focusing, or experiencing mental fog.
    Palpitations: Sensation of irregular or skipped heartbeats, fluttering, or a rapid increase in heart rate.

Severe bradycardia, or bradycardia accompanied by other heart rhythm abnormalities, can cause more serious symptoms such as chest pain, extreme shortness of breath, or loss of consciousness. These symptoms may indicate a medical emergency, and immediate medical attention should be sought.

Causes

There are several potential causes of a slow heart rate, or bradycardia. Some common causes of slow heart rate include:

Normal physiological response: In some cases, a slow heart rate can be a normal and healthy response, particularly in individuals who are physically fit or engage in regular aerobic exercise. Athletes and individuals with good cardiovascular fitness may have lower resting heart rates.

  • Aging: As people age, the heart’s electrical system may naturally slow down, leading to a slower heart rate. This is often a gradual process and may not cause symptoms in some individuals.
  • Medications: Certain medications can cause bradycardia as a side effect. These may include beta-blockers used to treat high blood pressure, some types of antiarrhythmics, certain heart rate-lowering medications, and some medications used to treat mental health conditions.
  • Heart conditions: Various heart conditions can lead to a slow heart rate. These can include:
  • Sinus node dysfunction: Dysfunction in the sinus node, the heart’s natural pacemaker, can result in a slow heart rate. This condition is known as sinus bradycardia.
  • Heart block: Heart block occurs when there is a blockage or delay in the electrical signals that regulate the heartbeat. It can be classified into different degrees, such as first-degree, second-degree, or third-degree heart block.
  • Cardiomyopathy: Certain types of cardiomyopathy, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or dilated cardiomyopathy, can lead to a slow heart rate.
  • Metabolic imbalances: Electrolyte imbalances, particularly imbalances in potassium or calcium levels, can disrupt the heart’s electrical activity and result in bradycardia.
  • Hypothyroidism: An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) can cause a slow heart rate as a result of decreased thyroid hormone levels.
  • Infections: Certain infections, such as myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) or endocarditis (infection of the heart valves), can affect the heart’s electrical system and lead to bradycardia.

Diagnose

Diagnosing a slow heart rate, or bradycardia, involves a thorough medical evaluation and assessment of symptoms. A healthcare professional, usually a cardiologist or an electrophysiologist, will typically follow a diagnostic process that may include the following:

  • Medical history: The doctor will inquire about any previous cases or family history of heart conditions or cardiac rhythm disorders.
  • Physical examination: A examination will be performed to assess your overall health, including checking your pulse and blood pressure. The doctor may listen to your heart using a stethoscope to detect any abnormalities.
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG): An ECG is a non-invasive .test that records the electrical activity of the heart. It is the primary tool for diagnosing bradycardia. Electrodes are placed on the chest, and the ECG machine measures the heart’s electrical signals, providing information about the heart rate and rhythm.
  • Holter monitoring: If the slow heart rate is intermittent or not consistently present during an office visit, the doctor may recommend a Holter monitor. This portable device is worn for 24 to 48 hours or longer, continuously recording the heart’s electrical activity. It can capture any episodes of bradycardia that occur outside of the medical office.
  • Event monitor: It is a portable device that is worn for a longer duration, usually weeks or even months. It is used when the bradycardia episodes are infrequent or sporadic. The monitor is activated by the individual when they experience symptoms, and it records the heart’s electrical activity during that time.
  • Exercise stress Test: In some cases, an exercise stress test may be recommended to evaluate the heart’s response to physical exertion. It involves walking on a treadmill or using an exercise bike while being closely monitored to assess how the heart rate and rhythm change during exercise.
  • Echocardiogram: An echocardiogram uses ultrasound waves to create images of the heart’s structure and function. It can help evaluate the heart’s pumping ability, valves, and any structural abnormalities that may be causing bradycardia.
  • Blood tests: Blood tests may be conducted to check for any underlying medical conditions that could contribute to bradycardia, such as thyroid hormone levels, electrolyte imbalances, or signs of infection.

The diagnostic approach will depend on the individual’s specific symptoms, medical history, and the suspected underlying cause of the slow heart rate. Based on the results of these tests, the healthcare professional will make a diagnosis and recommend an appropriate treatment plan if necessary.

Diagnosis of slow heart beat

Treatment

The treatment of bradycardia depends on the severity of symptoms, the underlying cause, and the individual’s overall health. In addition to the treatments mentioned above for slow heart rate due to small stones, other general treatment options for bradycardia include:
  • Medications: In some cases, medications like atropine or epinephrine may be administered to increase the heart rate temporarily.
  • Lifestyle modifications: Making certain lifestyle changes, such as avoiding excessive alcohol or caffeine intake, quitting smoking
  • Treating underlying conditions: If bradycardia is caused by an underlying medical condition, such as an electrolyte imbalance or thyroid disorder, treating the underlying condition may resolve the slow heart rate.
  • Pacemaker implantation: In more severe cases, when bradycardia persists or causes significant symptoms, a pacemaker may be recommended to regulate the heart rate and ensure adequate blood flow.
Ongo care doctor wearing stethoscope pointing left hand

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Self Care

Self-care measures can play a supportive role in managing certain aspects of slow heart rate (bradycardia). While self-care alone may not treat the underlying cause of bradycardia, these practices can help promote overall heart health and potentially alleviate some symptoms. Here are some self-care strategies that can be beneficial:

  • Regular Exercise: Engaging in regular physical activity, as recommended by your healthcare provider, can help improve cardiovascular fitness and strengthen the heart.
  • Balanced and Heart-Healthy Diet: Consuming a well-balanced diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats is beneficial for heart health.
  • Hydration: Staying properly hydrated is important for overall health, including heart health.
  • Avoiding stimulants: Certain substances can affect heart rate and rhythm. It is advisable to limit or avoid the consumption of excessive caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine, as they can potentially exacerbate or trigger heart rhythm abnormalities.
  • Stress Management: Chronic stress can impact heart health. Practicing stress management techniques such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, yoga, or engaging in hobbies and activities that promote relaxation can be beneficial. Adequate sleep and maintaining a healthy work-life balance are also important for managing stress.
  • Medication Adherence: If you have been prescribed medications for underlying conditions contributing to bradycardia, it is crucial to take them as directed by your healthcare provider. Adhering to the prescribed medication regimen can help manage the underlying condition and potentially improve heart rate.
  • Regular follow-Ups: It is important to attend regular check-ups with your personal healthcare provider to monitor your heart health and any underlying conditions contributing to bradycardia. They can assess your progress, make any necessary adjustments to your treatment plan, and provide guidance and support.

Prevention

Prevention of slow heart rate (bradycardia) largely depends on addressing underlying causes and promoting overall heart health. While some causes of bradycardia may not be preventable, adopting certain lifestyle habits and taking preventive measures can help reduce the risk or severity of bradycardia. Here are some preventive measures that may be beneficial:

  • Manage Underlying Medical Conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as thyroid disorders, electrolyte imbalances, or heart diseases, can contribute to bradycardia. Proper management and treatment of these conditions, as advised by your healthcare provider, can help prevent or manage bradycardia.
  • Regular Check-Ups: Routine medical check-ups are important to monitor your heart health. Regularly visiting your healthcare provider allows for the early detection and management of any underlying conditions that may contribute to bradycardia.
  • Medication Management: If you are taking medications that can potentially cause bradycardia as a side effect, it is crucial to follow your healthcare provider’s instructions and dosage recommendations. Do not make any changes to your medication regimen without consulting your doctor.
  • Avoiding illicit Drug Use: Illicit drugs, such as cocaine or amphetamines, can have adverse effects on the heart, including causing changes from normal heart rate. Avoiding the use of illicit drugs can help prevent heart-related complications, including bradycardia.
  • Stress Management: Chronic stress can impact heart health. Engaging in stress management techniques, such as deep breathing exercises, and meditation.
  • Prompt Medical Attention: If you experience any symptoms of bradycardia or heart rhythm abnormalities, such as dizziness, fainting, or palpitations, seek prompt medical attention.
Prevention of slow heart rate

When to See a Doctor

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any warning signs or symptoms that may be associated with a slow heart rate (bradycardia). Here are some warning signs that should prompt you to see a doctor:
  • Fainting or loss of consciousness: If you faint or lose consciousness, it could be a sign of an underlying heart rhythm abnormality, including bradycardia. Fainting episodes should always be evaluated by a healthcare professional.
  • Dizziness or Lightheadedness: Feeling dizzy or lightheaded, especially if it occurs during activities or changes in position (such as standing up from a seated or lying position), may indicate a slow heart rate. This symptom should not be ignored and should be evaluated by a doctor.
  • Fatigue or Weakness: Persistent fatigue or weakness, even with normal daily activities, may be a symptom of bradycardia. If you are consistently experiencing unexplained fatigue or weakness, it is important to seek medical evaluation.
  • Shortness of Breath: Breathlessness or difficulty breathing, especially during physical exertion or when lying flat, could be a sign of reduced blood flow due to a slow heart rate. This symptom should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.
  • Chest pain or discomfort: While bradycardia is not typically associated with chest pain, it is important to note that underlying heart conditions or other cardiovascular problems can cause both chest pain and bradycardia. Chest pain should always be taken seriously and evaluated promptly.
  • Palpitations: Palpitations are sensations of an irregular or pounding heartbeat. If you experience palpitations along with other symptoms like dizziness, fainting, or shortness of breath, it is important to consult a healthcare professional for evaluation. Episodes of confusion or difficulty concentrating: Bradycardia can sometimes result in reduced blood flow to the brain, leading to confusion, difficulty concentrating, or memory problems. These symptoms should be assessed by a medical professional.

Ongo Care Team

Ongo Care is a telemedicine platform that offers several benefits to individuals seeking medical care, including assistance with slow heart rate (bradycardia) or other health concerns. Here are some ways in which Ongo Care can help:
  • Remote Consultations: Ongo Care enables individuals to have virtual consultations with healthcare professionals from the comfort of their own homes. This convenient and accessible service allows patients to discuss their symptoms, medical history, and concerns related to bradycardia or other health conditions.
  • Expert Medical Advice: Through Ongo Care, patients can connect with experienced doctors who specialize in cardiology or other relevant fields. These medical professionals can provide personalized advice, answer questions, and offer guidance regarding bradycardia management and treatment options.
  • Symptom Assessment: Using Ongo Care’s telemedicine platform, individuals can describe their symptoms related to bradycardia and receive an initial assessment of their condition. This can help determine the urgency of seeking further medical care and provide initial recommendations for self-care or next steps.
  • Convenience and Accessibility: Ongo Care eliminates the need for physical visits to healthcare facilities, reducing travel time and waiting room exposure. Patients can access medical care from anywhere with an internet connection, making it especially beneficial for individuals with limited mobility or those residing in remote areas.
  • Continuity of Care: Ongo Care offers a seamless and coordinated approach to healthcare. It allows patients to have ongoing communication with their healthcare provider, ensuring that they receive consistent and comprehensive care for their bradycardia or other health conditions.
  • Secure and private Platform: Ongo Care prioritizes patient privacy and security. The platform utilizes secure and encrypted communication channels to protect personal health information, ensuring confidentiality during virtual consultations.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can Ongo Care help me with my slow heart rate?
Ongo Care provides remote consultations with experienced healthcare professionals who specialize in cardiology. They can assess your symptoms, provide expert advice, and guide you on managing your slow heart rate.
Can I receive a diagnosis for my slow heart rate through Ongo Care?
Ongo Care offers initial assessments of symptoms related to slow heart rate. However, a definitive diagnosis may require further evaluation, such as diagnostic tests or in-person consultations with healthcare providers.
Is Ongo Care a secure platform for telemedicine consultations?
Yes, Ongo Care prioritizes patient privacy and employs secure and encrypted communication channels to protect personal health information during virtual consultations.