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Home » Sprains and Strains

Telemedicine for Sprains and Strains: How OngoCare Can Help You Recover Faster

Overview

Overview

Symptoms

Symptoms

Causes

Causes

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Treatment

Treatment

Self-care

Self Care

Overview

What is a Sprain?

Sprains and strains are very common injuries that can affect the ligaments, tendons, and muscles in the body. While they share similarities, sprains, and strains are distinct in terms of the tissues affected. A sprain refers to an injury to a ligament, which is the tissue that connects bones to each other and provides stability to joints. Sprains commonly occur when a joint is twisted, stretched, or forced beyond its normal range of motion. These injuries often affect the ankles, wrists, knees, and thumbs. Depending on the severity, sprains can be classified into three grades: mild, moderate, and severe. A strain, on the other hand, refers to an injury to a muscle or tendon. Tendons are fibrous tissues that connect muscles to bones. Strains typically occur due to overstretching or excessive contraction of a muscle or tendon. Strains commonly affect the back, hamstrings, quadriceps, and shoulders. Similar to sprains, strains can also be classified into mild, moderate, and severe categories. Medical professionals often refer to sprains and strains by various names based on the affected area or severity. For example, an ankle sprain can be called a lateral ligament sprain, while a groin strain may be referred to as an adductor strain. The names may vary depending on the healthcare provider or medical literature. Sprains and strains are quite common in the United States. Both sprains and strains progress through various phases during the healing process. While the exact terminology may differ slightly, the general phases include:
  • Acute phase: This is the initial phase following the injury, characterized by pain, swelling, inflammation, and limited range of motion. Rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) are commonly recommended during this phase to reduce swelling and manage pain.
  • Subacute phase: During this phase, the initial inflammation begins to subside, and the injured tissues gradually heal.
  • Remodeling phase: In this phase, the injured tissues continue to heal and strengthen. Specific exercises and rehabilitation protocols are implemented to enhance tissue remodeling and improve overall function.
  • Return to activity phase: The final phase involves a gradual return to normal activities or sports, with a focus on preventing re-injury. This phase typically includes functional exercises, sport-specific training, and conditioning programs.
sprain vs strain

Symptoms

The symptoms of sprains and strains can vary depending on the severity of the injury, the affected area, and individual factors. However, there are some common symptoms associated with both sprains and strains. Here are the typical symptoms:

Sprain Symptoms:

  • Pain: Sprains often cause localized pain at the site of the injured ligament.
  • Swelling: Sprains are usually accompanied by swelling around the injured joint. This swelling is caused by inflammation and increased blood flow to the area.
  • Bruising: In some cases, sprains can cause bruising around the injured joint. The bruising occurs due to damaged blood vessels leaking blood into the surrounding tissues.
  • Limited range of motion: Sprains can restrict the normal movement of the affected joint. You may find it difficult or painful to move the joint through its full range of motion.
  • Tenderness: The injured area may feel tender to the touch, and pressing on it may cause pain.
  • Instability: Severe sprains can lead to joint instability, making it difficult to bear weight or maintain balance.

Strain Symptoms:

  • Pain: Strains typically cause pain in the muscle or tendon that has been injured.
  • Muscle weakness: Strains may result in muscle weakness or a feeling of fatigue in the affected muscle.
  • Swelling: Like sprains, strains can also cause swelling in the injured area.
  • Muscle spasms: Strained muscles may go into spasms or involuntary contractions, causing additional pain and discomfort.
  • Limited range of motion: Strains can restrict the normal range of motion of the affected muscle or joint.
  • Muscle stiffness: The injured muscle may feel stiff and tight, making movement uncomfortable.

Causes

Sprains and strains can be caused by various factors, including:
  • Sudden force or impact: Sprains and strains often occur when a joint or muscle is subjected to a sudden force or impact beyond its normal range of motion. This can happen during sports activities, falls, or accidents.
  • Overstretching: Stretching a ligament, muscle, or tendon beyond its normal limits can lead to sprains or strains. This can occur due to excessive stretching during physical activity, improper technique, or inadequate warm-up.
  • Sports activities: Participating in sports that involve sudden movements, changes in direction, or high-impact actions can increase the risk of sprains and strains. Sports like basketball, soccer, tennis, and skiing are particularly associated with these injuries.
  • Improper lifting techniques: Lifting heavy objects using improper form or technique can strain the muscles and tendons in the back, leading to strains. This is common in activities such as weightlifting, moving furniture, or performing manual labor.
  • Repetitive movements: Performing repetitive motions or overusing certain muscles or joints can result in strain injuries over time. This is commonly seen in activities like typing, gardening, or playing musical instruments.
  • Weak muscles or poor conditioning:Weak muscles, poor flexibility, or inadequate conditioning can increase the risk of sprains and strains. When the muscles supporting a joint are weak, they may not provide enough stability, making the joint more susceptible to injury.
  • Fatigue or inadequate rest: Engaging in physical activity while fatigued or without sufficient rest can compromise the body’s ability to maintain proper form and control, increasing the risk of injury.
  • Previous injuries: Having a history of previous sprains or strains can make the affected area more prone to future injuries. Weakened ligaments, muscles, or tendons may be more susceptible to sprains or strains.

Diagnose

The diagnosis of sprains and strains typically involves a combination of a physical examination, medical history assessment, and sometimes imaging tests. Here is an overview of the diagnostic process:
  • Physical Examination: The healthcare provider will begin by conducting a physical examination to assess the injured area. They will look for signs of swelling, bruising, deformity, or tenderness. They may also evaluate the range of motion and stability of the joint or muscle.
  • Medical History Assessment: The healthcare provider will inquire about the circumstances surrounding the injury, such as the activity or event that led to the symptoms. They may also ask about the nature and progression of the symptoms, previous injuries, and any underlying medical conditions.
  • Imaging Tests: In some cases, imaging tests may be recommended to confirm the diagnosis and assess the severity of the injury. Commonly used imaging modalities include X-rays, which can help rule out fractures, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provides detailed images of soft tissues like ligaments, muscles, and tendons.
  • Specialized Tests: Depending on the suspected injury, additional specialized tests may be ordered. For example, if a ligament tear is suspected, a stress test or specific ligament tests may be performed to evaluate the stability of the joint.
  • Differential Diagnosis: The healthcare provider will consider other possible causes of the symptoms and rule out other conditions that may mimic sprains or strains, such as fractures, dislocations, bursitis, or tendonitis.
Diagnosis of Sprains and Strains

Treatment

The treatment of sprains and strains aims to relieve pain, reduce swelling, promote healing, restore function, and prevent further injury. The specific treatment options may vary depending on the severity of the injury, the affected area, and individual factors. Here are some common treatment measures:
  • Rest: Resting the injured area is crucial to allow the tissues to heal. Avoid activities that exacerbate pain or further strain the injured area. Immobilization may be recommended in some cases, such as using crutches for a sprained ankle or a splint for a strained wrist.
  • Ice: Applying ice packs or cold compresses to the injured area can help reduce swelling and pain.
  • Compression: Compression with an elastic bandage or wrap helps control swelling and provides support to the injured area. Ensure that the compression is snug but not too tight to impede circulation.
  • Elevation: Elevating the injured area above the heart level helps reduce swelling by promoting fluid drainage. For example, when treating a sprained ankle, prop the foot up on a pillow while sitting or lying down.
  • Pain Relief: Over-the-counter pain medications like acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help alleviate pain and reduce inflammation.
  • Physical Therapy: Depending on the severity and stage of healing, a healthcare professional may recommend specific exercises and physical therapy.
  • Bracing or Supportive Devices: In some cases, the use of braces, splints, or supportive devices may be recommended to provide stability and protect the injured area during the healing process.
  • Rehabilitation: As the healing progresses, a healthcare professional may prescribe a rehabilitation program tailored to the individual’s needs. This may include a combination of exercises, stretching, strengthening, and functional training to restore full function and prevent future injuries.
  • Surgery (in severe cases): In rare instances where there is significant damage, such as a complete ligament tear or severe muscle/tendon injury, surgery may be necessary. This decision is made by a healthcare professional based on the specific circumstances of the injury.
Ongo care doctor wearing stethoscope pointing left hand

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Self Care

Self-care plays a crucial role in managing sprains and strains and can contribute to a more successful recovery. Here are some self-care measures that can help in managing sprains and strains:
  • Rest: Adequate rest is essential to allow the injured tissues to heal. Avoid activities that worsen pain or strain the affected area. Give yourself time to recover and avoid pushing through the pain.
  • Pain Relief: Over-the-counter pain medications like acetaminophen or NSAIDs (e.g., ibuprofen) can help alleviate pain and reduce inflammation. Follow the recommended dosage instructions and consult a healthcare professional if you have any concerns or underlying medical conditions.
  • Protect and Support: Use supportive devices, such as braces or splints, as directed by a healthcare professional, to provide stability and protect the injured area during daily activities. These devices can help prevent further injury and promote healing.
  • Gradual Return to Activity: Once the initial acute phase has passed and with guidance from a healthcare professional, gradually reintroduce activities and exercises that do not cause pain or discomfort. Start with gentle range-of-motion exercises and gradually progress to strengthening and functional exercises.
  • Maintain Overall Fitness: While recovering from a sprain or strain, it’s important to maintain overall fitness and conditioning. Focus on exercises that do not aggravate the injury, such as low-impact activities or exercises targeting unaffected areas.
  • Follow Medical Advice: Adhere to the treatment plan and recommendations provided by your healthcare professional. Attend follow-up appointments as scheduled, and communicate any concerns or changes in symptoms.

Prevention

Preventing sprains and strains involves adopting certain preventive measures and lifestyle choices. Here are some key strategies to help reduce the risk of these injuries:
  • Warm-Up and Stretching: Before engaging in physical activities or sports, warm up your muscles with light aerobic exercises to increase blood flow and raise your body temperature. Follow it up with dynamic stretching to improve flexibility and prepare the muscles for activity.
  • Proper Technique and Form: Learn and use proper techniques and form when participating in sports, exercise, or any physically demanding activities. This includes using appropriate body mechanics, posture, and movement patterns to minimize stress on the joints, ligaments, muscles, and tendons.
  • Conditioning and Strength Training: Regularly engage in conditioning exercises and strength training to improve muscular strength and endurance.
  • Gradual Progression: When starting a new exercise program or increasing the intensity or duration of physical activities, do so gradually. Avoid sudden, excessive increases in intensity, which can overload the muscles and lead to injuries.
  • Protective Gear and Equipment: Use appropriate protective gear and equipment specific to the activity or sport you are participating in. This includes wearing helmets, mouthguards, goggles, and supportive shoes, or using braces and pads to protect vulnerable areas.
  • Environmental Awareness: Be mindful of your surroundings, especially in sports or outdoor activities. Look out for uneven surfaces, obstacles, or potential hazards that could lead to trips, slips, or falls.
  • Rest and Recovery: Allow adequate rest and recovery time between workouts or physically demanding activities. This gives your body time to repair and rebuild, reducing the risk of overuse injuries.
  • Hydration and Nutrition: Stay properly hydrated and maintain a balanced diet to support overall health and musculoskeletal function. Proper hydration helps maintain tissue elasticity, while adequate nutrition supports muscle strength and recovery.
  • Listen to Your Body: Pay attention to any warning signs or discomfort during physical activities. If you experience pain, fatigue, or other symptoms, take a break, and seek medical attention if needed.
  • Regular Check-ups and Assessments: Regularly visit healthcare professionals for check-ups and assessments, especially if you have a history of previous injuries or conditions that may increase your risk of sprains and strains. They can provide guidance on injury prevention strategies specific to your individual needs.
Prevention from sprain and strain

When to See a Doctor

While many sprains and strains can be managed with self-care measures, there are certain warning signs and situations where it is important to seek medical attention. Here are some indications that you should see a doctor:
  • Severe Pain: If you are experiencing intense or persistent pain that is not relieved by self-care measures, it is advisable to consult a healthcare professional. Severe pain may indicate a more serious injury or underlying condition.
  • Inability to Bear Weight: If you are unable to put any weight on the injured limb or joint, it may suggest a severe sprain or fracture. Seeking medical attention is crucial for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.
  • Significant Swelling and Bruising: Excessive swelling and bruising that occur rapidly or progressively can be a sign of a more severe injury. A healthcare professional can assess the extent of the damage and provide appropriate treatment.
  • Joint Instability: If the injured joint feels unstable or gives way when you try to use it, it may indicate a severe sprain or ligament tear. Seeking medical attention is important to evaluate the joint’s stability and determine the appropriate course of action.
  • Restricted Range of Motion: If you experience significant difficulty moving the injured joint or muscle, or if there is a noticeable loss of range of motion, it is advisable to see a doctor. Limited mobility may indicate a more severe injury or the need for specialized treatment.
  • Numbness or Tingling: If you have numbness, tingling, or a “pins and needles” sensation in the injured area, it could indicate nerve involvement. This should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.
  • Deformity: Any visible deformity or misalignment of the affected joint or limb requires immediate medical attention, as it may indicate a fracture or dislocation.
  • Previous Injury or Chronic Condition: If you have a history of previous sprains or strains in the same area, or if you have a pre-existing condition that affects your musculoskeletal system, it may be beneficial to consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and management.
  • Prolonged or Worsening Symptoms: If your symptoms persist for an extended period or worsen despite self-care measures, it is important to seek medical advice. Delayed or inadequate treatment can lead to complications or delayed healing.

Ongo Care Team

Ongo Care is a telemedicine platform that can provide valuable assistance in the management of sprains and strains. Here’s how Ongo Care can help:
  • Remote Consultations: Ongo Care allows you to have virtual consultations with healthcare professionals from the comfort of your own home. Through video or audio calls, you can discuss your symptoms, receive expert advice, and get recommendations for self-care measures or further medical intervention.
  • Immediate Access to Healthcare Professionals: With Ongo Care, you can connect with healthcare professionals without the need for appointments or long wait times. This ensures timely access to medical guidance and reduces the need for physical visits to clinics or hospitals.
  • Assessment and Diagnosis: Through Ongo Care, healthcare professionals can assess your symptoms, review your medical history, and provide an accurate diagnosis. They can evaluate the severity of the injury, determine if any further tests or imaging are necessary, and advise on the appropriate course of action.
  • Treatment Guidance: Ongo Care enables healthcare professionals to provide personalized treatment guidance based on your specific injury. They can recommend self-care measures, prescribe appropriate pain medications if needed, and guide you on home exercises or physical therapy techniques that can aid in recovery.
  • Monitoring and Follow-Up: Ongo Care allows for remote monitoring and follow-up consultations, ensuring that you receive ongoing support throughout your healing process. Healthcare professionals can track your progress, adjust treatment plans as needed, and provide additional guidance or referrals if required.
  • Convenience and Accessibility: Ongo Care eliminates the need for travel and physical visits to healthcare facilities, making it a convenient option, particularly for individuals with mobility limitations or those in remote areas. It provides accessible healthcare services anytime, anywhere, using a computer or mobile device.
  • Cost-Effectiveness: Telemedicine platforms like Ongo Care can be a cost-effective option compared to in-person visits. It eliminates the expenses associated with travel, parking, and waiting room fees, making healthcare more affordable and accessible.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use Ongo Care for a sprained ankle?
Absolutely! Ongo Care can connect you with healthcare professionals who can assess your sprained ankle, provide guidance on self-care measures, and recommend appropriate treatment options.
Is Ongo Care covered by insurance?

Coverage for telemedicine services varies depending on your insurance provider. It’s best to check with your insurance company to determine if Ongo Care is included in your coverage.

Can I get a prescription for pain medication through Ongo Care?
Yes, healthcare professionals on Ongo Care can prescribe pain medication if deemed necessary based on your evaluation and symptoms. However, note that certain controlled substances may have additional regulations.
Is Ongo Care suitable for follow-up appointments after a strain injury?
Absolutely! Ongo Care is a convenient option for follow-up appointments. Healthcare professionals can monitor your progress, provide guidance on exercises or therapy, and adjust treatment plans as needed without the need for in-person visits.